Press in YIMBY: Red Terra Cotta Exterior Revealed After 312-322 Canal Street’s Major Design Update, Tribeca by Paul Castrucci

 BY: JORDAN BEECHE 8:00 AM ON JANUARY 22, 2018

BY: JORDAN BEECHE 8:00 AM ON JANUARY 22, 2018

An updated design has been submitted to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for 312-322 Canal Street, in the West Tribeca Historic District. The site is currently occupied by a two-story retail space, owned by the developer, Trans World Equities. An initial design proposal was submitted in 2011 by Paul A. Castrucci Architect, but was denied by the LPC after being deemed too bland for the area.

 Current status of 312-322 Canal Street.

Current status of 312-322 Canal Street.

The updated design submitted again by Castrucci on January 23rd, 2018 is still pending approval. If approved, the lot would give rise to a nine-story residential building, with retail space on the first floor. The structure would rise to 76 feet, 12 feet higher than the existing average for the block.

Construction would yield an estimated 54,250 square feet of space aboveground, plus an additional 7,750 square feet in the basement.

 Retail spaces on the ground floor.

Retail spaces on the ground floor.

The ground floor would offer three retail opportunities, and floors two through six would each feature four one-bedroom apartments. The seventh floor is slated to be a four bedroom penthouse unit with private terrace access. Residents would also have access to bicycle storage in the basement and recreational space on the roof.

 Close up of terra cotta facade.

Close up of terra cotta facade.

Castrucci has proposed a brick-red terra cotta facade which will frame inset floor-to-ceiling windows on each floor. The architecture firm describes the project as entering into “a critical dialogue with its surrounding context. The façade’s repetition recalls some of the underlying structural rhythms of the historical district’s notable palazzo-style, cast-iron facades, but avoids replicating or reproducing their forms, details or material choices.”

The building is also slated to be passive house certified; it will use high efficiency heat pumps to condition individual interior units in addition to energy recovery ventilators which provide units with cooled, filtered fresh air.

Plans will go before the LPC on Tuesday for approval.

Press in AIA News Letter : In the News November by Paul Castrucci

aia logo.JPG

November 16, 2017
by Linda G. Miller

Passive Private House
A recently-completed two-family row house at 158 Clifton in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn achieves a near Net Zero energy capability. Designed by Paul A. Castrucci Architect, the 4,000-square-foot, wood-framed structure was gut-renovated to the Passive House New York EnerPHit standard to create a three-story residence, plus an additional apartment in the basement. The project uses recycled materials throughout. The front façade, which is a reinterpretation of the historic vernacular, is clad in blackened ship-lap siding. The process of burning the exterior of the wood, known as Shou Sugi Ban, protects it from the elements, making a wood façade that will be virtually maintenance-free for decades. By applying the process to recycled Douglas fir that otherwise would be unsuitable for exterior use, the design makes the best use of the material and prevents it from being discarded. On the rear façade, wooden slats recycled from the Coney Island boardwalk create a modern rain screen. The roof insulation is recycled polyiso, and reclaimed wood will also be used throughout the interior. Mechanical systems are designed to minimize energy use. High-efficiency mini-split units heat and cool the apartments and are much smaller than in typical apartments due to the reduced heating and cooling loads. Hot water is supplied with heat pump hot water heaters, and LED lighting is used throughout. A 7.5kW solar photovoltaic array is installed on the roof. The project was featured in the International Passive House Days, an annual event that offers builders, engineers, architects, and green building enthusiasts tours of Passive House projects with their designers.

Link to original news letter

New York Passive House Days : Clifton Residence Open House by Paul Castrucci

On Friday Nov. 10, 2017 New York Passive house and Paul A. Castrucci Architect participated in International Passive House Days. From 10 – 12 November 2017, the International Passive House Open Days, put on by iPHA and its international Affiliates, took place for the 14th year in a row. By visiting a Passive House home, office, or even construction site, you can experience the benefits of Passive House first hand!

 

Open House

Sawkill Lumber and Paul A. Castrucci Architect opened the recently completed townhouse in Bedford-Stuyvesant Brooklyn. The open house tours are great places for builders, engineers, architects and green building enthusiasts to learn about the project, and network with many experts in the field. The tour started on the first floor (garden level apt was not open to the public) in the living room area and then migrated to the kitchen and dinning area. Paul Castrucci was on hand with David White of Right Environment .   A few topics covered were thermal break issues, passive house detailing for timber frame retrofits, working with reclaimed wood, and custom double pane windows. Over 50 people were in attendance. 

Tour of First Floor

 

Passive House Family Zone

Paul A. Castrucci Architect is committed to community and families. The firm worked with it's host partner SawKill Lumber to create a Passive House Family Zone where children are welcome to play puzzle games and read children's books on sustainability. The firm wanted to create an environment that would be welcoming for working families interested in learning about Passive House Design. The open house was from 4-6pm a prime time for family time. 

 

Second and Third Floor Tour

Paul Castrucci and David White invited participants to tour the second and third floors. The third floor is an educational space dedicated to AIA, passive house and sustainability events. The room was organized to show a slide show of passive house projects from the firm's portfolio, SawKill Lumber samples with information, and reception area for networking.

Clifton Residence - BLOWER DOOR TEST “PASSED!” by Paul Castrucci

Posted onNovember 4th, 2017 by ALAN SOLOMON Link to original post

Sawkill Passive House passed the critical passive house blower door test on Friday, conducted by David White of Right Environments, working with Castrucci Architect and Blueline Construction. The house passed within just 1 CFM (Cubic Foot per Minute) of the test standards cut-off – a cliffhanger by building energy standards. Two days earlier, the reading hovered three points higher and out of reach. At that time, all the scouring for micro-leaks in the envelope of the house seemed exhausted; window gaskets were tightened, ventilation hoods tuned, electrical penetrations plugged; each step circling closer, but still short. It was unclear what to do.

But Mother Nature stepped in. Readings can vary slightly from successive tests at the same site. Within that natural range, it is also possible that varied weather conditions account for the difference. As they say, “You can’t step in the same river twice”. On Friday, with lower winds and higher temperatures, the indoor and outdoor environments were unseasonably equal, and that raised a prospect for a new and passing measure. David thought it was worth a try.

David White lives down the block from Prospect Park, and about a fifteen minute bike ride to 158 Clifton. His retro-fitted eight foot bicycle could haul the morning produce of a restaurant, but it’s more regularly strapped down with equipment from “Minneapolis Air Blower”. The bike and its cargo are easily managed by the 6’2” cyclist.

The air blower apparatus is a simple device – supported by a mountain of research. It pressurizes the entire house, but outside of a fan humming, you’d never know the blower door test was even happening. Within minutes, a computer registers dots along an axis; and then it stops for a moment, and the fan is flipped around, with air removed; and de-pressurizing, resulting in an average reading from multiple points of the  building envelope. If there are ghosts in the Victorian era row house, as an older resident on the block claimed early on, they would have certainly caught wind of the air blower test.

The computer graphic – a grid with round and square dots – often tells the story. But it was too close to call on Friday. David clicked through to the precise numerical data and paused, searching the numbers and then said “we passed.” It was just one-quarter-of-one-percent within range, and that was enough.

If it wasn’t. the alternative – which could have produced a passing number for the house months ago – was to “pressurise the neighbours”. This involved setting up similar systems that would flank the row house with pressurised volumes, and act like a headwind against microscopic air loss. Pressurizing just one adjacent house would blow the door off the standards firm threshold, lopping off 100 cfm’s, and it would be completely within the bounds of test procedure. But it was a last resort, and the neighbours of course were already a help, simply living with a party wall in a row house.

The Passive House Certification process prompted a systematic check for air and energy leakage, and a fine tuning process of actions, and it added up to real performance gains. But it was the attention to detail in the construction phase that made the difference. Going back to the bones of the 1880’s building, the old growth softwood joists; each was retained and sistered, and then subject to a thoughtful sealing sequence, with ‘no turning back’. Any energy leakage would be locked in, maybe for generations. All along the way, similar issues were encountered in a structure that was “….in as bad shape as any that I’ve encountered.” said Jim Hartin of Blueline.

Castrucci, Right Environments and Blueline have transformed an old building into one that is, 130 years later, in as good shape as any they’ve encountered. The PHI energy numbers alone may back that up.158 Clifton may also be a first wooden row house to reach certification in New York, and is part of the growing movement to retro-fit across the city.

As David was breaking down the blower door, he noticed one small part of the unit unclamped. “Hmm, that could have been another cfm or two.”

Blow door demonstration with David White and Paul Castrucci Architect by Paul Castrucci

A blower door is a machine used to measure the airtightness of buildings. It can also be used to measure airflow between building zones, to test ductwork airtightness and to help physically locate air leakage sites in the building envelope.

Demonstration was part of Open House New York Weekend Open House. 

Instagram Update: Open House New York at Clifton Residence by Paul Castrucci

David of #rightenvironment preparing for #blowdoor #demonstration after question and answer session in #bedstuy #rowhouse

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@zamboni_i and Alan of #sawkilllumbers during the question and answer segment at @openhousenewyork in #bedstuy #brooklyn

A post shared by Paul. Castrucci.Architect (@paul.castrucci.architect) on

#kitchen tours at #clifton #residence for @openhousenewyork with grayson the #projectarchitect

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@openhousenewyork in #bedstuy #brooklyn with david of Right Environments talking about #mechanical #systems

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@openhousenewyork grayson the #projectarchitect with @riseboronyc

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Open House New York - Question and Answer segment during the open house. by Paul Castrucci

During the open house the public got a chance to ask the team questions about the row house and the passive house process. Afterwards the audience got a chance to see a demonstration of a blow door test machine.

About The Clifton Residence

The 158 Clifton Residence is a two family row house in Brooklyn, New York. The structure is being gut-renovated to the Passive House New York EnerPHit standard and supplemented with a Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Array to achieve near Net Zero energy capability.

The building is a wood frame structure, which is rare in New York City. Some of the typical Passive House details used in other projects needed to be modified to account for different thermal and moisture conditions of the structure.As a retrofit, special consideration was required to air seal the building. Paul Castrucci, Architect developed air sealing details specifically for this project and followed up with contractors’ training and inspections to ensure proper installation.

About OHNY
For two days each October, Open House New York Weekend unlocks the doors to New York’s most important buildings, offering an extraordinary opportunity to experience the city and meet the people who design, build, and preserve New York. From colonial to contemporary, residential to industrial, hundreds of sites across the five boroughs are open to visit, with tours, talks, performances and other special events taking place over the course of the weekend. Through the unparalleled access that it enables, OHNY Weekend deepens our understanding of the importance of architecture and urban design to fostering a more vibrant civic life and helps catalyze a citywide conversation about how to build a better New York.

International presentation for Net Zero architecture and ABC No Rio at Paul Castrucci Architect by Paul Castrucci

Wendy Brawer is one of this year's TED fellows and co-developer for award winning R951 Residence. She invited an international group to tour top GreenMap sites.  Wendy Brawer is the creator of the Green Map, a tool that uses distinctive iconography to denote green-living, natural, social, and cultural resources. Locally led in 65 countries, GreenMap.org will soon relaunch with a new, open approach to inspire greater action on climate health and environmental justice among residents and travelers alike.

The presentation focused on basic passive house principles, net zero projects and ABC No Rio as one of the first Passive House art spaces.

Paul Castrucci Architect at 2017 Open House New York by Paul Castrucci

OHNY001_158clifton_emilydryden.jpg

For two days each October, Open House New York Weekend unlocks the doors to New York’s most important buildings, offering an extraordinary opportunity to experience the city and meet the people who design, build, and preserve New York. From colonial to contemporary, residential to industrial, hundreds of sites across the five boroughs are open to visit, with tours, talks, performances and other special events taking place over the course of the weekend. Through the unparalleled access that it enables, OHNY Weekend deepens our understanding of the importance of architecture and urban design to fostering a more vibrant civic life and helps catalyze a citywide conversation about how to build a better New York.


Site Name - 158 CLIFTON RESIDENCE

Site Address - 158 Clifton Pl Brooklyn New York 11238

October 14th | 2pm to 6pm

 

Website URL -  https://www.castrucciarchitect.com/clifton/

Architect - Paul A. Castrucci

Project Architect - Grayson Jordan 

Contractor - Blue Line Construction, Inc. 


About the Site

Recently completed, 158 Clifton is a two family timber framed row house in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. The row house is a unique showcase of reclaimed wood and built to Passive House EnerPHit standard.   It is a modern interpretation of a traditional wood clapboard row house.The row house was easily adapted to meet passive house retrofit ultra low energy use, with an expected 70% reduction in heat and cooling load. Because of the reduction in energy use no fossil fuel is being used on site.


The renovation was an extensive use of reclaimed wood from New York. The front façade is an old growth Douglas Fir utilizing the traditional Japanese art of charring exterior siding, Sho Shugi Ban. The rear façade is recycled Ipe from the Coney Island boardwalk.  The use of Coney Island boardwalk creates a modern rain screen and stark contrast to the front. This renovation reduced the energy demand of the building to the extent that the planned rooftop solar installation brings the Owner’s unit into Net Zero capability.


The woods in the triplex of the house generally follow the geographical area where they were originally harvested. The parlor floor us made of Southern Long-leaf Pine and this wood follow through the common areas. The second floor bedrooms include a mix of mid-Atlantic hardwoods. The top floor loft is antique Eastern White Pine. The homeowner is developing the top floor loft is dedicated to hosting sustainable salons and educational programming.

OHNYLogo_Black.jpg

Social Media
Facebook: http://facebook.com/openhousenewyork
Instagram: @openhousenewyork
Twitter: @ohny
#OHNYwknd


Follow the event and our progress via social media

Mavirk windows installed and affordable housing projects inprocess by Paul Castrucci

Mavrik windows are well priced and were just the right window for our passive house retrofit project in the East Village. The Mavrik team was great to work with and had deep technical understanding of the product as well as Passive House design. The team provided quality service and timely delivery. We are very pleased with the outcome.
— Paul A. Castrucci Architect

Special thanks to Mavirk, Inc. for the photographs

 

544 E 13TH STREET AFFORDABLE HOUSING RESIDENCES

 

377 E 10th Street Affordable HOUSING Residences

 

Scenes from International Passive House Conference Weekend by Paul Castrucci

International Passive House Conference

Friday June 16 launched the International Passive House Weekend in New York City. Paul Castrucci, principle and Grayson Jordan, R.A. attended.  This year's conference and expo, "Towards Market Transformation" was held at the Metropolitan Pavilion and featured over 30 manufacturers and service providers. Presentation were given by New York and International architects focused on transforming the market and leading the way towards a cleaner and healthier built environment.  The conference also provided a vehicle for building upon relationships with the firm's community group partners and fellow architects. 

 New York Passive House featured the firm's  project R-591  on the cover of the convention trifold. 

New York Passive House featured the firm's project R-591 on the cover of the convention trifold. 

Top Facebook Live Moments

The International Passive House Association conference talk on mixed use in mixed climates

Habitat for Humanity doing passive house at The International Passive House Association

Cold climate Passive house for production facility at The International Passive House Association

Posted by Paul A. Castrucci, Architect on Friday, June 16, 2017

Final thoughts before cocktails at new york Passive house conference

Summer Passive House Days

 Open House at 158 Clifton Pl

On Saturday June 17, the firm participated in a city wide Summer Passive House Days.  Summer Passive House Days are a way for architects, homeowners, clients and developers to get a first hand experience of the many advantages Passive Houses offer! Open house tours are great places for builders, engineers, architects and green building enthusiasts to learn about projects, and network with many experts in the field. The firm created a multimedia experience using QR codes that showed the participant video documentation of the process, blog post to more detailed information on the woods, systems and products. The QR codes were strategically place to offer a multimedia experience though out the space.

EnerPhit Rehab of existing 3 story plus Basement plus Cellar two family building. Passive House wood frame rowhouse renovation with extensive use of reclaimed wood throughout, including Sho Shugi Ban (burnt Douglas Fir) front facade and recycled Ipe from the Coney Island Boardwalk on the rear façade.  This renovation reduced the energy demand of the building to the extent that the planned rooftop solar installation brings the Owner’s unit into Net Zero capability.

Red Hook Artist Studio Brooklyn, NY by Paul Castrucci

Courtyard and Entrance Area

20170531_0878_18 COMMERCE ST_BROOKLYN.jpg
 

Communial Kitchen for Outdoor Dinning and Entertaining


Main Studio Space

 
 
 

Basement and Ceramic Studio in Main Studio Space

 


Back Studio with Skylighing Details

 

Additional Spaces Above Communal Kitchen

Art Opening/Work on Display : “WRONG SIDE OF HISTORY” at Bullet Space, NY, NY by Paul Castrucci

“WRONG SIDE OF HISTORY”

| | Mar 21, 2017 | Article Link

May 18-June 18
Opening May 18, 2017 6-9pm

Paul A. Castrucci, Martha Rosler, Tom McGlynn, John Fekner, Anton van Dalen, Margaret Weber, Scott Lawrence, Simone Mantellassi, Thomas Lanighn -Schmidt, Janice Sloane, Alexandra Rojas Leonid Sokov, Walter Gurbo, Robert Parker, John Farris, Sue Coe, Winston Smith, Robert Upham, Colleen O’Reilly, David Wojnarowicz, Melvin Way, Walter Sipser, Richard Hambleton, Raymond Pettibon & others

Paul Castrucci work on display

Posted by Paul A. Castrucci, Architect on Thursday, May 18, 2017
 

“WRONG SIDE OF HISTORY” at Bullet Space

Gallery images and opening reception


Vertical Tour of "Wrong Side Of Wrong" by curator and founder of Bullet Space Andrew Castrucci.

Posted by Paul A. Castrucci, Architect on Thursday, May 18, 2017

Press: Rosario Dawson’s family wants to buy low-income housing units in the East Village by Paul Castrucci

POSTED ON MON, MAY 15, 2017BY ANNIE DOGE

  544 West 13th Street under construction in January, via  Paul A. Castrucci Architect  (L)

544 West 13th Street under construction in January, via Paul A. Castrucci Architect (L)

Actress Rosario Dawson’s family hopes to buy low-income apartments in a newly renovated building as part of a city program that converts abandoned homes into affordable units. Rosario grew up in an East Village squatter’s den and her family continues to live in the East 13th Street co-op, even after the actress became famous and amassed a net worth of more than $16 million. According to the New York Post, long-time tenants of the building say the Dawson family bullied their way into controlling a third of the 14-unit residence over the last 20 years.

 

The 19th-century building at 544 East 13th Street (between Avenues A and B) has been owned by the nonprofit Urban Homesteading Assistance Board since 2002, and the city sold the property for $1 each to aid the non-profit’s goal of helping squatters take legal ownership of the properties. However, its co-op conversion did not begin until 2015 and the city has spent $1.78 million for renovations. Squatters now are being given the chance to buy apartments there for $2,500 each, but they can earn no more than $53,450 per year have to live in the building at least 270 days of the year to be considered eligible.

Rosario’s mother, Isabel, who says charity work takes her out of the city much of the year, doesn’t want to adhere to the primary residency rule. During a December 2016 meeting, Isabel asked the nonprofit representative if the rule can be changed to just six months.

One of the original squatters, Annie Wilson, discovered the building in 1986 overrun by feral cats and garbage. Wilson, an activist and artist, worked with other community members to restore the building and bring in water and electricity. She told the post that Rosario financially backs her family. “She’s supportive of her parents. I don’t understand why she hasn’t acquired housing for them elsewhere so these units could be for New Yorkers in need.”

The Dawsons first landed at the East Village co-op in 1986 and were voted by other squatters to occupy apartment 4C. Although the family soon moved to Texas, they continued to sublet their unit to others, a peculiar move for tenants in this type of building. When they returned to East 13th Street, Isabel allegedly became physically aggressive with neighbors. In a 2001 letter, the president of the Tenants’ Association, Alfa Diallo, wrote, “Isabel Dawson’s threatening and violent behavior have jeopardized the safety of the residents.”

Despite these complaints, Isabel and other Dawson family members were able to stay in the building, and ss the Post reported, the family spread their squatting to other apartments, even taking over one unit while its tenant was at work. Isabel’s husband event started living in a room on the first floor that tenants hoped to turn into a gallery or music room.

Adam Leitman Bailey, a lawyer who represents the Dawsons, told the Post that after reviewing the family’s tax returns, all of them are qualified to buy the apartments. “I can guarantee you that none of them are wealthy,” he said.

[Via NY Post]

Brooklyn Open House in June by Paul Castrucci


International Summer Open Passive House 2017

Saturday, June 17
2pm

Location : 158 Clifton Place, Brooklyn
with our partner SawKill Lumber


 

EnerPhit Rehab of existing 3 story plus Basement plus Cellar two family building. Passive House wood frame rowhouse renovation with extensive use of reclaimed wood throughout, including Sho Shugi Ban (burnt Douglas Fir) front facade and recycled Ipe from the Coney Island Boardwalk on the rear façade.  This renovation reduced the energy demand of the building to the extent that the planned rooftop solar installation brings the Owner’s unit into Net Zero capability.

 

Project Team:

Paul A. Castrucci, Architect

Alan Solomon, Sawkill Lumber Company

Right Environments, MEP and PH consultant

Blue line Construction

 

 

Contact Person:

rosalinda@castrucciarchitect.com or 212.254.7060

Published on Jun 14, 2016

Video about 158 Clifton Place, Brooklyn NY by Sandra Beltrao


 

Details and Progress Documentation

Project in Process: In search of the Classic Red Brick for 312-322 Canal St by Paul Castrucci

The material choices for 312-322 Canal Street veers toward the common place elegance rather than the extravagant. The firm choose a standard red-brick, historically used, as the face material of the building. The materiality of this classic red-brick brings utility and practicality to the 100 feet-long elevation along Canal Street. The firm is still reviewing brick samples with the developer and searching for just the right classic red-brick . . .

Link to project

Press Bowery Boogie : Stairway to Nowhere: The Final Days of the Original ABC No Rio on Rivington Street by Paul Castrucci

Posted on: April 13th, 2017 at 5:00 am by Elie

Demolition of a half-block of Rivington Street is full speed ahead, and with it, the destruction of the both the old ABC No Rio headquarters and the former Streit’s Matzo factory. For the last several weeks, the buildings comprising 148-156 Rivington have been decimated in dramatic fashion. A combination of Bobcats, backhoes, and handtools.

It’s a sad spring for this corner, as more than one hundred years of history is now a pile of rubble and dust.

As previously reported, ABC No Rio is currently hosting programs in exile while its new “passive house” at 156 Rivington Street is under construction. The state-of-the-art facility – designed by local architect Paul Castrucci – will eventually boast larger exhibition and performance spaces (doubling the size), in addition to a green roof and second-floor terrace. The solar-equipped building will also have an elevator and carry the organization’s zine library, computer lab, print shop, dark room, and kitchen.

ABC No Rio purchased 156 Rivington Street from the city In 2006 for one dollar. Since then, the organization has raised more than $8 million in both private donations and city grants. Plans for the 9,000 square-foot, Leed-certified structure are eight years in the making.

What remains is a stairway to nowhere.