press

Public Relations Event : Building Brooklyn Awards by Paul Castrucci

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Building Brooklyn  Awards


EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BUILDING BROOKLYN AWARDS  

Honoring 11 construction and Renovation Projects that Enrich Brooklyn's Neighborhoods and Economy

 

Historical Restoration Winner
 

158 Clifton Residence Winning Team

Owner: Sawkill Lumber/ Alan Soloman

Architect: Paul A. Castrucci Architect

Project Architect: Grayson Jordan

Builder: Blue Line Construction

Sustainability Consultant: Right Environments

 


Awards Night Event

Wednesday | August 1, 2018
6pm Awards Program
7pm Cocktail Reception


Location

1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge
Meadow Rue Ballroom
60 Furman Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 (Map it!)

Summer News : Awards - Publication - Press by Paul Castrucci

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Building Brooklyn  Awards


EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BUILDING BROOKLYN AWARDS  

Honoring 11 construction and Renovation Projects that Enrich Brooklyn's Neighborhoods and Economy

 

Wednesday | August 1, 2018
6pm Awards Program
7pm Cocktail Reception


Location

1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge
Meadow Rue Ballroom
60 Furman Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 (Map it!)

Link to tickets and registration
 

 

Historical Restoration Winner
 

158 Clifton Residence Winning Team

Owner: Sawkill Lumber/ Alan Soloman

Architect: Paul A. Castrucci Architect

Project Architect: Grayson Jordan

Builder: Blue Line Construction

Sustainability Consultant: Right Environments

 


Publication

 

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GET A FREE COPY 

We are proud to participate in the latest Passive House publication with Low Carbon Productions


From Small to EXTRA LARGE  : Passive House Rising to New Heights

 

Architect and projects profiles featured on pages 75-83.

To request a copy contact : info@nypassivehouse.org

 

 


In the News


ABC No Rio featured as "The Modern Passive House"
- ON AIR : LG HVAC Story


As Andreas Benzing notes in the introduction to a new guide, From Small to Extra-Large : Passive House Rising to New Heights, "New York City is fast becoming becoming a Passive House epicenter of the country" 
- Treehugger by Lloyd Alter


 "Three projects by Paul A. Castrucci Architect are described in the publication, including ABC No Rio’s new headquarters in the Lower East Side, which is one of the first passive commercial buildings in the city . . . The thermal breaks are essential for reducing energy consumed in regulating the interior temperatures throughout the seasons, according to the passive building philosophy."
- Architect Newspaper by Alex Wong


 

Press : CityViews: Let’s Stop the Zero-Sum Debate Pitting Open Space vs. Affordable Housing by Paul Castrucci

By Karen Haycox and Scott Short | June 21, 2018

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The vision for Haven Green.

As New York City grapples with the challenges of fitting a growing population into its finite borders, residents and government alike must reexamine how we use our public land. The predominant community development models of prior decades, used when eradicating urban blight was the priority, are outdated. Now that we have transformed a city full of vacant lots into a city full of people, we must ensure that all public land is put to its highest and best use. This prevailing need to do more with less has in some cases, drawn new battle lines where alliances once existed.

Nonprofit community development organizations like RiseBoro Community Partnership and Habitat for Humanity New York City, as stewards of public resources, are often the ones tasked with meeting competing public priorities within constrained environments. We have found that the growing scarcity of available public land has pitted potential allies, open space advocates and affordable housing advocates, against each other in competition for a dwindling piece of the pie.

This resource rivalry has most recently, and perhaps most tragically, resurfaced in relation to projects serving communities which are facing increasing market value, where inequitable market forces threaten to push out longtime residents. As an ongoing impact of historic inequity continuing to play out across the city, communities now feel pressured to choose between affordable housing resources or open space access. We believe that the choice between affordable housing and open space is a false dichotomy, that they are in fact complementary components of thriving communities, and that we can and must have both at the same time.

The complex goals of communities must be addressed holistically, with a commitment to developing assets that enrich and empower resident experience. This can only be achieved when projects that utilize public assets are developed to explicitly maximize public benefit. Affordable housing and open public space are both essential to the health and vitality of communities, but must not be considered a zero sum game.

CityViews is City Limits’ showcase for opinions from around the city and the world.

RiseBoro and Habitat NYC’s partnership with Pennrose Properties to redevelop a City-owned parcel, which is currently utilized as a community-led garden space, into a new project known as Haven Green accomplishes just that – preserving access to cherished open space while providing affordable homes for one of our most vulnerable populations.

Seniors are the fastest growing population in the United States, and the need for affordable senior housing has never been greater. A study by LiveOn estimates 200,000 individuals remain on the waiting list for senior affordable housing throughout New York City, averaging seven years. Affordable housing is especially difficult to find for the historically marginalized LGBTQ community. At the same time, we understand the desire of many in Little Italy to preserve every piece of publicly accessible open space in an increasingly gentrified community. That is why our proposal for Haven Green is a marriage of these ideals: more than 120 units of low-income, LGBTQ-friendly, senior housing located within a public, locally-stewarded garden reimagined through a community-led participatory design process.

Engaging with complex narratives and creating collaborative opportunity where potential conflict exists is the essence of the challenging and rewarding work of community development. We believe that when government, communities, and mission-driven developers work together we can create projects that empower individuals, satisfy multiple priorities, and deliver wide-ranging social benefit. Threading this needle successfully is critical to the urgent work of making our cities livable and sustainable for generations to come.

Karen Haycox is the CEO of Habitat for Humanity New York City and Scott Short is the CEO of RiseBoro Community Partnership.

Link to original article

Our Partners in the Press : The Community Builders CDE Awarded $50M for Neighborhood Investments by Paul Castrucci

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On February 13, 2018 the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund awarded The Community Builders CDE LLC a $50 million New Markets Tax Credit allocation. This is their fourth NMTC award, which now total $140 million. They have deployed previous awards to support 16 projects of various types across eight states and Washington, D.C.

This allocation advances The Community Builders’ mission to build and sustain strong communities for people of all incomes. They plan to target this allocation to support neighborhood business and amenity projects that create jobs and economic activity while addressing needs of communities where TCB families live.  We enjoy working with The Community Builders and share many core values with them. 

You can read more about the Treasury announcement here.
 

Press CurbedNY : Contested Tribeca apartment building finally clears Landmarks by Paul Castrucci

The plan was sent back to the drawing board several times before it was finally approved on Tuesday

By Amy Plitt and Tanay Warerkar

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UPDATE 1/23/18: The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission resoundingly approved a proposal to replace a set of low-rise commercial buildings on Canal Street with a seven-story residential building, on Tuesday.

The Commission liked the revised approval presented by the architecture firm Paul Castrucci Architect, which reduced the height of the building from nine stories to seven stories, and reduced the facade material from red brick to terra cotta, to be more in line with the buildings in the neighborhood (more details on the latest iteration of this project below).

The Commission praised the firm for heeding all of its advise from a previous hearing in July last year, but still had a few pointers. The Commissioners agreed that the architect should either do away with the current glazing on the building’s facade or try to pick a more muted version of the color they’re presently going with. They also asked the architect to reduce the ceiling height on the building’s penthouse to make it less visible from street level.

The architect will now work with the Commission’s staff to rectify those concerns as this project moves forward.

Seven months after the Landmarks Preservation Commission decided to take no action on the proposed new buildings at 312-322 Canal Street, a revised proposal for the project is due to be presented before the LPC at tomorrow’s meeting. It’ll be the third time that plans for this parcel of land will appear before the LPC.

Let’s back it up a bit: Paul Castrucci Architect, the firm behind the (now stalled) revamp of ABC No Rio, has been trying to get plans for a new Canal Street building approved since 2011, when changes to the storefronts those addresses encompass were made without LPC approval. (The buildings are part of the Tribeca East Historic District.) The 2011 proposal was nixed, and it took the firm until last year to come back with revised plans—which were summarily rejected by the LPC for being “completely inappropriate.”

What did the commission have an issue with? Just about everything: “There is a real problem with the monolithic aspect of this application, and it takes away from the granular nature of Canal Street,” LPC chair Meenakshi Srinivasan said during June’s meeting, where she noted that the site deserved a building that is “new and contemporary.”

It remains to be seen if the revised plans, which will be presented during tomorrow’s LPC meeting, will fit the bill. One of the biggest changes concerns the building’s height; the previous proposal put the roof height at 97 feet high, but the revised one takes it down to a bit over 86 feet (with the street-facing wall going to 76.6 feet). And rather than having a flat, brick facade, the revised plans now include a facade made from terra cotta, not so dissimilar to that of Annabelle Selldorf’s 10 Bond Street.

The building will still be home to more than a dozen apartments (most of them one-bedrooms, with one four-bedroom penthouse), with three ground floor retail spaces. Maybe, as the old adage goes, the third time’s the charm?

Take a look at the full revised plans here. We’ll update with more information on the LPC vote as it becomes available.

Press in AIA News Letter : In the News November by Paul Castrucci

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November 16, 2017
by Linda G. Miller

Passive Private House
A recently-completed two-family row house at 158 Clifton in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn achieves a near Net Zero energy capability. Designed by Paul A. Castrucci Architect, the 4,000-square-foot, wood-framed structure was gut-renovated to the Passive House New York EnerPHit standard to create a three-story residence, plus an additional apartment in the basement. The project uses recycled materials throughout. The front façade, which is a reinterpretation of the historic vernacular, is clad in blackened ship-lap siding. The process of burning the exterior of the wood, known as Shou Sugi Ban, protects it from the elements, making a wood façade that will be virtually maintenance-free for decades. By applying the process to recycled Douglas fir that otherwise would be unsuitable for exterior use, the design makes the best use of the material and prevents it from being discarded. On the rear façade, wooden slats recycled from the Coney Island boardwalk create a modern rain screen. The roof insulation is recycled polyiso, and reclaimed wood will also be used throughout the interior. Mechanical systems are designed to minimize energy use. High-efficiency mini-split units heat and cool the apartments and are much smaller than in typical apartments due to the reduced heating and cooling loads. Hot water is supplied with heat pump hot water heaters, and LED lighting is used throughout. A 7.5kW solar photovoltaic array is installed on the roof. The project was featured in the International Passive House Days, an annual event that offers builders, engineers, architects, and green building enthusiasts tours of Passive House projects with their designers.

Link to original news letter

Press in The Daily News : SUN CITY: New York homeowners are signing on to go solar at historically high rates by Paul Castrucci

SUN CITY: New York homeowners are signing on to go solar at historically high rates

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Thursday, August 6, 2015, 1:00 PM by Katherine Clarke

Ray Sage and Paul Castrucci, the developers of Brooklyn’s "Passive" House, show off their solar panels   (BYRON SMITH/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

Ray Sage and Paul Castrucci, the developers of Brooklyn’s "Passive" House, show off their solar panels

 (BYRON SMITH/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

The Big Apple is showing the rest of the country how to do solar power right.

Solar installations in the city have tripled in just two years — thanks to a spate of government rebates and credits that cut down on up-front costs.

It’s not just about saving the world. Now, most panel purchasers will see a return on their initial investments within six years, experts said.

“If you have the ability to write a big check in the beginning, it makes sense,” said Stacey Max, a real estate broker with Bond New York who’s installing solar panels on her Flushing roof. “My husband and I want to stay in our home forever so it’s probably smart to make it as efficient as possible.”

Nearly 2,200 city residents were permitted to install solar panels in 2014, compared to just 662 in 2013. And so far in 2015, 1,180 New Yorkers have gotten solar approvals.

"People are starting to realize that solar’s not just something for hippies and rich people and that it actually does make a ton of sense,” said Gaelen McKee, president of Brooklyn SolarWorks, which installs solar panels on local homes. “It’s really exciting.”

Solar’s cheaper than ever before but you still have to have a good chunk of money in the bank to get started and navigate the high upfront costs.  Link to original article